The Divided Dominion: Social Conflict and Indian Hatred in Early Virginia

Submitted by FHMaster on Tue, 01/10/2017 - 20:07

"In The Divided Dominion, Ethan A. Schmidt examines the social struggle that created Bacon's Rebellion, focusing on the role of class antagonism in fostering violence toward native people in seventeenth-century Virginia. This provocative volume places a dispute among Virginians over the permissibility of eradicating Native Americans for land at the forefront in understanding this pivotal event.

Democracy Reborn: The Fourteenth Amendment and the Fight for Equal Rights in Post-Civil War America

Submitted by FHMaster on Tue, 01/10/2017 - 15:03

"A riveting narrative of the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment, an act which revolutionized the U.S. constitution and shaped the nation's destiny in the wake of the Civil War

Though the end of the Civil War and Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation inspired optimism for a new, happier reality for blacks, in truth the battle for equal rights was just beginning. Andrew Johnson, Lincoln's successor, argued that the federal government could not abolish slavery. In Johnson's America, there would be no black voting, no civil rights for blacks.

The Cousins' Wars: Religion, Politics, Civil Warfare, And The Triumph Of Anglo-America

Submitted by FHMaster on Mon, 01/09/2017 - 19:17

"The question at the heart of The Cousins’ Wars is this: How did Anglo-America evolve over a mere three hundred years from a small Tudor kingdom into a global community with such a hegemonic grip on the world today, while no other European power—Spain, France, Germany, or Russia—did? The answer to this, according to Phillips, lies in a close examination of three internecine English-speaking civil wars—the English Civil War, the American Revolution, and the American Civil War.

The Counterrevolution of Slavery: Politics and Ideology in Antebellum South Carolina

Submitted by FHMaster on Mon, 01/09/2017 - 19:13

"In this comprehensive analysis of politics and ideology in antebellum South Carolina, Manisha Sinha offers a provocative new look at the roots of southern separatism and the causes of the Civil War. Challenging works that portray secession as a fight for white liberty, she argues instead that it was a conservative, antidemocratic movement to protect and perpetuate racial slavery.

The Counter-Revolution of 1776: Slave Resistance and the Origins of the United States of America

Submitted by FHMaster on Mon, 01/09/2017 - 18:56

"The successful 1776 revolt against British rule in North America has been hailed almost universally as a great step forward for humanity.  But the Africans then living in the colonies overwhelmingly sided with the British.  In this trailblazing book, Gerald Horne shows that in the prelude to 1776, the abolition of slavery seemed all but inevitable in London, delighting Africans as much as it outraged slaveholders, and sparking the colonial revolt. 

Confederate Reckoning: Power and Politics in the Civil War South

Submitted by FHMaster on Mon, 01/09/2017 - 14:48

"Stephanie McCurry tells a very different tale of the Confederate experience. When the grandiosity of Southerners’ national ambitions met the harsh realities of wartime crises, unintended consequences ensued. Although Southern statesmen and generals had built the most powerful slave regime in the Western world, they had excluded the majority of their own people—white women and slaves—and thereby sowed the seeds of their demise. "

Confederate Emancipation: Southern Plans to Free and Arm Slaves during the Civil War

Submitted by FHMaster on Mon, 01/09/2017 - 14:44

"In early 1864, as the Confederate Army of Tennessee licked its wounds after being routed at the Battle of Chattanooga, Major-General Patrick Cleburne (the "Stonewall of the West") proposed that "the most courageous of our slaves" be trained as soldiers and that "every slave in the South who shall remain true to the Confederacy in this war" be freed.